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Heavy-Duty Engine Rebuild | What Owner-Ops Should Know

Heavy-Duty Engine Rebuild | What Owner-Ops Should Know

A heavy-duty engine rebuild can be a costly and time-consuming repair that no truck owner looks forward to. At Western Truck and Trailer, our world-class service team has helped many owner-operators get through the process with minimal expense and inconvenience. We do both In-frame - typically done as preventative maintenance or to restore power - and out-of-frame overhauls
 

The In-frame Engine Rebuild

 
heavy-duty truck engine
 
An owner-op might consider an In-Frame rebuild if their engine has begun to show signs of age and lost power. Common symptoms of a failing engine include poor fuel economy, loss of coolant, and excessive​ blowby ​(exhaust gases seeping into the engine block). As the name suggests, the engine remains in the truck during an In-Frame rebuild. After disassembly and inspection of the engine's major components, the technician will replace the pistons, the piston rings, and the cylinder sleeves. A new crankshaft and new main bearings will also be installed. The head-gasket, as well as any O-rings and other gaskets, removed, will also be replaced with new components.
 

The Out-of-Frame Overhaul

 
An out-of-frame overhaul requires the engine to be pulled from the truck for repair. This means considerably more labour and expense than an In-Frame rebuild. Failure of one of the main engine parts such as the crankshaft or a piston rod can lead to an out-of-frame rebuild. Occasionally, components on high mileage engines experience warping and require machining to get them back to specs. The Out-of-Frame rebuild process includes the same steps as the in-frame, with several additions. During an Out-of-Frame overhaul, the service technician will also remove and measure the crankshaft for proper clearances, and replace it, if needed. In addition, the mechanic will check that the cylinder head and the engine block mate properly, and machine the surface of one, or both, needed.
 

The Post-Rebuild Break-In Procedure

 
All engines require special care to seat the new piston rings against the cylinder sleeves during the break-in period after a rebuild. Owners should avoid light load conditions that lead to high RPMs during this time. Working under full load will enable the rebuilt motor to properly seat the piston rings. Experts suggest pulling the truck's maximum allowable weight at a high gear for a distance of three to five-hundred kilometres.
 
Another more controlled method of breaking in an engine involves the use of a dynamometer. A dynamometer lets the service technician(s) closely monitor the rebuilt engine's load and RPMs by running it in a controlled environment. Employing a dynamometer ensures that the break-in procedure is done correctly and that the overhauled engine will deliver peak performance when it goes into service. On the flip side, failure to break-in an engine properly after a rebuild may result in excessive oil consumption, low power, and poor fuel economy - the problems that initiated the work in the first place.

 

 

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Categories: Heavy Trucks, Trucks, Dump Truck

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